Italian ALMA Regional Centre

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The Italian node of the European ALMA Regional Centre is hosted by the Istituto di Radioastronomia in Bologna and is one of the seven nodes that constitute the European network that provides technical and scientific support to ALMA users. The nodes operate in close collaboration with each other and with the ALMA Regional Centre at ESO, Garching. Each node contributes its own specific expertise, in order to ensure that maximum advantage is taken of the European competences in the field of mm-astronomy and interferometry.

Our ARC node staff support the ALMA users in all the steps of their projects, by helping in

  • ALMA proposal preparation and submission
  • optimising the observing strategy
  • tracking the project status
  • reducing interferometric data with CASA
  • archive mining
  • handling large data sets
  • polarimetry
  • mm-VLBI with ALMA


Five years of Early Science with ALMA and the Italian ARC-node

Five Years of Early Science: a look at the performance of the Italian community, and the activities of the Italian ARC-node

Next events at the Italian ARC:

ALMA Data Handling Workshop 9-12 February 2016, Bologna
ALMA science seminar tour 2016 March-April 2016, at Italian Institutes on request
ALMA proposal preparation day 2016 11-12 April 2016, Bologna

Past Events at the Italian ARC:

ALMA proposal preparation day 2015 9 April 2015, Bologna
Terzo Workshop sull'Astronomia Millimetrica in Italia 20-21 January 2015, Bologna
Workshop on mm-VLBI with ALMA 22-23 January 2015, Bologna

ALMA News:

ALMA Observes Most Distant Oxygen Ever
First Detection of Methyl Alcohol in a Planet-forming Disc
ALMA Witness Intergalactic Deluge Feeding a Black Hole
ALMA Reveals Footprints of Baby Planets in a Gas Disk
Cometary Belt around Distant Multi-Planet System Hints at Hidden or Wandering Planets
ALMA Measures Mass of Black Hole with Extreme Precision
Dwarf Dark Galaxy Hidden in ALMA Gravitational Lens Image
ALMA's Best Image of a Protoplanetary Disk